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ERIC Identifier: ED399411
Publication Date: 1996-00-00
Author: Wagner, Judith O.
Source: ERIC Clearinghouse on Adult Career and Vocational Education Columbus OH.

Wired: The Electronic Job Search. ERIC Digest No. 172.

"No doubt about it. Computer technology is spiriting us into an era when jobs and people will find each other in high-speed and interactive ways we never imagined five years ago." (Kennedy 1994, p. 43)

A search of the World Wide Web using the terms "job search" and "employment opportunities" turns up an incredible number of sites that offer information on everything from job banks to state employment services to the successful job search to career planning services to resume development tips to every other conceivable aspect of finding a job. This ERIC Digest discusses some of the latest developments in the electronic job search--particularly on the World Wide Web (WWW)--and describes some of the available resources and sites.

People find a job in a number of ways, including networking, visiting the public library for information connected with the job search, taking advantage of the resources of the state department of education, and looking at school career centers (Wagner 1989). Contemporary job search strategies for college students include starting early, getting experience, going directly to employers, making job hunting a full-time job, and using all available networks and connections (Imel 1994). These methods are still very effective, but a brand new ingredient has been added to the mix--technology. The vast world of the Internet provides another avenue for those looking for a job.

Dolan and Schumacher (1994) queried people on several Internet listservs about finding jobs in the library and information science professions. Of the 35 who responded, 20 percent had found a job via the Internet. Respondents indicated that the 'Net is a good job resource for automation or computer specialists, that some positions are listed only on the 'Net, and that ads on the 'Net usually come out in advance of print copy.

Most of the websites offer a variety of services, although a few are limited to only one or two. Some are commercial and charge for their services; some are public and/or do not. For general information about finding a job, searching the web using the terms "job search," employment opportunities," or "resumes" will lead to a myriad of resources. To locate information about specific positions, it is more effective to do a keyword search being as specific as possible, e.g., "restaurant management" ("Cyberspace Help-Wanted" 1996).

Doing a job search on the Internet does not guarantee instant success. However, it is a way to increase visibility by offering a resume to a much larger audience than could otherwise be reached (Weiss 1996).

Many colleges and universities include postings of employment opportunities on their web pages. Although most see this as a great advantage, others point out the disadvantages of the electronic job search. Some employers list only those positions that require experienced applicants--not the entry-level jobs. Many of the disadvantages of doing a job search through newspapers--undesirable, hard-to-fill positions; high turnover jobs; few middle-level jobs--are also present in an online search (Wagner 1992). In addition, it is difficult to authenticate the job sources--are they legitimate? Some discourage students from putting their resumes on display because of the loss of control of personal information (Levenson 1995).

"Technology promises many positive developments for the modern job seeker and human resource professional. Alone, technology is not enough; coupled with traditional methods of job hunting and recruiting, it can be a pillar of support and an outstanding ally" (Kennedy and Morrow 1994, p. 43)

Websites and listservs come and go, and addresses and URLs (Uniform Resource Locators) that are correct one day may disappear the next. A web search will identify currently available sites. The list of websites, listservs, and newsgroups that follows provides a starting point for those who are undertaking an electronic job search.

GENERAL INFORMATION ABOUT JOB OPENINGS

AMERICA'S JOB BANK

U.S. Department of Labor

http://www.ajb.dni.us/%20

Links 1,800 state Employment Service offices. Provides job seekers with the largest pool of active job opportunities available anywhere. Contains information on approximately 250,000 jobs.

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CAREER CONNECTION

http://www.connectme.com/%20

Includes job search information, resume advice, interview tips, cover letter advice, and links to other relevant sites.

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CAREER RESOURCE HOMEPAGE

http://www.rpi.edu/dept/cdc/homepage.html%20

Commercial job databases, employer-sponsored job information, professional organizations, universities, Internet newsgroups, and links to other resources.

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CAREERMOSAIC

http://www.careermosaic.com/%20

Job advice, resume tips, college links, links to international job opportunities, online job fairs, and a career resource center.

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CAREERPATH

http://www.careerpath.com/%20

Provides newspaper employment ads from 17 major cities.

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CATAPULT ON JOBWEB

http://www.jobweb.org/catapult/catapult.htm%20

Employment centers, colleges and universities, job search and industry information, relocation resources, and professional associations.

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THE DEFINITIVE GUIDE TO INTERNET CAREER RESOURCES

Oakland University

http://phoenix.placement.oakland.edu/career/internet.htm%20

Links to hundreds of sites that have job offerings and information.

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THE HELP-WANTED PAGE

http://www.helpwantedpage.com/%20

An easy-to-use guide to online employment.

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JOB SEARCH AND EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES: BEST BETS FROM THE NET

http://www.lib.umich.edu/chdocs/employment/%20

Pulls together the 'Net's best sources of job openings and career development information. Includes a description and evaluation of each resource.

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JOBPLACE

listserv@news.jobweb.org

Discusses self-directed job search techniques and placement issues.

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JOBTRAK

http://www.jobtrak.com/%20

Works with college and university career centers and offers a job listing service used by over 200,000 employers.

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NOICC

(National Occupational Information Coordinating Committee)

http://www.state.ia.us/government/wd/noicc/%20

Offers job search sites, career information, career counseling, and labor market information.

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O*NET

The Occupational Information Network

http://www.doleta.gov/programs/onet/%20

Identifies and describes occupations, worker skills, knowledges, abilities, and workplace requirements for jobs in all sectors of the economy.

SITES RELATED TO SPECIFIC OCCUPATIONS

ADVANCED FIREFIGHTER PLACEMENT CENTER

http://firefighter.com/dfire/ffjphp.html/%20

Includes a job directory, resume database, and a variety of forms.

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CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION

http://chronicle.merit.edu/%20

Includes information on job openings in academe.

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MEDICAL PRACTICE OPPORTUNITIES

http://worldmall.com/mpo/%20

Lists positions for health care providers.

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PHYSICIANS ASSISTANT AUTOMATED JOB SEARCH

http://www.jga.road.com/%20

A process to locate clinical opportunities.

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SPECIAL LIBRARIES ASSOCIATION EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

slajob@iubvm.bitnet

Special libraries

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VOCNET

vocnet@cmsa.berkeley.edu

Vocational education

RESUME INFORMATION AND POSTINGS

JOB SOURCE

http://www.jobsource.com/%20

Employer profiles, resume generator, internships, and a community message board.

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GUARANTEED RESUMES

http://users.aol.com/GResumes/index.htm

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RESUME DISTRIBUTION SERVICE

http://www.webplaza.com/pages/Careers/123Careers/123Careers.html%20

A free service that submits resume information to employers

PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATIONS

AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR INFORMATION SCIENCE

asis-l@asis.org

Library and information science

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OHIO COUNCIL OF LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SCIENCE

oclis@ohionet.org

Openings in library and information science, mostly in Ohio

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SPECIAL LIBRARIES ASSOCIATION EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

slajob@iubvm.bitnet

Special libraries

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WISBAR

http://www.wisbar.org/%20

Serves the members of the State Bar of Wisconsin and includes job listings.

GEOGRAPHIC LISTINGS

ABOUT STATE JOBS

http://www.das.state.or.us/jobs/jobhead.html%20

Currently available jobs with Oregon state government agencies.

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ST. CHARLES ADULT EDUCATION

http://www.icom.ca/[tilda]charles/

Job listing and career and business information for the Canadian job market.

NEWSGROUPS

In addition to websites, there are a number of Usenet newsgroups where people offer jobs, look for jobs, and post resumes. They include the following:

General

- misc.jobs

--misc.jobs.misc

- misc.jobs.offered

- vmsnet.employment

Specific occupations

- alt.jobs.gis.offered

- alt.jobs.gis.resumes

- bionet.jobs.offered

- bionet.jobs.wanted

- comp.jobs.offered

- geoinfonet.job-market

Geographical locations

- austin.jobs

- can.jobs

- cmb.jobs

- euro.jobs

- nyc.jobs.offered

- oh.jobs

Many of the jobs offered on newsgroups are listed by employment agencies and headhunting groups.

REFERENCES

"Cyberspace Help-Wanted Ads Multiply Opportunities to Find Work." COLUMBUS DISPATCH, August 8, 1996, p. 3B.

Dolan, D. R., and Schumacher, John E. "Top U.S. Sources for an Online Job Search." DATABASE 17, no. 5 (October-November 1994): 34-38, 40-43.

Imel, S. JOB SEARCH SKILLS FOR THE CURRENT ECONOMY. ERIC DIGEST NO. 150. Columbus: ERIC Clearinghouse on Adult, Career, and Vocational Education, 1994. (ED 376 274)

Kennedy, J. "The Job Search Goes Computer." JOURNAL OF CAREER PLANNING AND EMPLOYMENT 55, no. 1 (Fall 1994): 42-46.

Kennedy, J. L., and Morrow, T. J. ELECTRONIC JOB SEARCH REVOLUTION. New York: Wiley, 1994.

Levenson, L. "High-Tech Job Searching." CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION 41, no. 44 (July 14, 1995), pp. A16-A17.

Wagner, J. LOCATING JOB INFORMATION. ERIC DIGEST NO. 85. Columbus: ERIC Clearinghouse on Adult, Career, and Vocational Education, 1989. (ED 308 398)

Wagner, J. JOB SEARCH METHODS. ERIC DIGEST NO. 121. Columbus: ERIC Clearinghouse on Adult, Career, and Vocational Education, 1992. (ED 346 318)

Weiss, A. "Grad Seeks Job." INTERNET WORLD 7, no. 9 (September 1996): 76-79.


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